EPA ignored sexual harassment for more than a decade, whistleblowers claim

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Whistleblowers told a House committee that managers at the Environmental Protection Agency turned a blind eye to allegations of sexual harassment for more than a decade. The complainants said an employee at a Chicago branch office made inappropriate sexual advances, attempted to kiss them and referred to them as “sexy, sweetheart, sweetie, and darling.”

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