Agencies play 'Where's Waldo?' with two federal executives

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In this week’s Inside the Reporter’s Notebook, when someone goes on administrative leave, the rumor mill heats up across the federal community and agencies respond with the ubiquitous, “We can’t comment, it’s a personnel matter,” or “Yes, [fill in the person’s name] is still an employee at the agency and we have no other details.” The latest two examples come from the Interior Business Center and FDIC. Also in this edition...

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