Pentagon, VA say they’re sharing health records despite separate IT systems

Getty Images/iStockphoto/HASLOO

The departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs have been increasingly vocal about the work they have been doing over the past two years to achieve interoperability in the absence of a common electronic health record.

More News
Expert Insights
Radio Interviews
Most Shared
  • Application Security Imperatives- Where is The New Perimeter?

    Today, even in the Fed space, it is all about the apps – being able to access the information or content you need, when you need it. But just providing the app is a job half done. What really matters is the app experience.

  • Contextual Intelligence: Deciphering Disparate Data in Government

    Agencies face two primary challenges in knowledge management: Data Diversity and Institutional Knowledge.

  • Agency of the Month: U.S. Department of Education

    Agency of the Month examines the many important facets of government agencies. Each month, Federal News Radio speaks with top executives from a specific agency about the issues most important to its mission. The Agency of the Month for July 2015 - the U.S. Department of Education.

  • Disaster Resilience for America

    In the latest edition of “Disaster Relief for America”, hosts Tim Karney and Tom Moran interview Greg Carbin, the Warning Coordination Meteorologist at NOAA.

  • Ask the Industry Expert

    Evergreen ITS President Terrance Martin joined WTOP & Federal News Radio Custom Media Director Jason Fornicola for a discussion on IT trends in the federal government.

  • Higher Bandwidth, Lower Cost: Managed Broadband for Your Agency Network

    Federal News Radio's Tom Temin sits down with Hughes Network Systems Tony Bardo, Ricardo Belmar, and Mike Cook to discuss the advantages of transitioning to managed broadband. The team from Hughes explains how distributed agencies can add bandwidth while reducing their network costs simultaneously with managed broadband services that are available via their GSA Schedule.

  • Ed Ramotowski: Streamlining State’s visa processes

    The State Department is churning out student and tourist visas at a record clip. They now number about 10 million a year — a 50 percent increase over 2010. To achieve those numbers, while decreasing wait times, the department had to streamline its processes. Ed Ramotowski is the deputy assistant Secretary of State for visa services in the department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs. He and his team are finalists for this year’s Service to America medals for their work. On the Federal Drive with Tom Temin, he says his marching orders came from the White House.

  • Alan Paller: Cyber priorities post-cybersprint

    For agency managers responsible for cybersecurity, the last few weeks have been challenging. The data breach affecting millions might have been the direct responsibility of the Office of Personnel Management, but the response has been all-of-government – starting with the now-concluded 30-day cyber sprint. Cyber is a matter of technology, skill and people. Alan Paller, the director of research at the SANS Institute, joined Jared Serbu on the Federal Drive to offer some perspective on what CIOs and cybersecurity officers need to do next.

  • Kerri Childress: Fisher House turns 25

    Twenty-five years ago, the first Fisher House opened at what was then the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Its purpose was to provide a home away from home for families to be near their wounded warriors and veterans. The Fisher House Foundation continues to provide temporary, no-cost lodging at 65 locations today. Kerri Childress is vice president of communications for the Fisher House Foundation. On the Federal Drive, she told Federal News Radio’s Tom Temin more about some of the recent additions.

  • Nora Bensahel: A summer reading list for new members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    The Senate has confirmed Marine Corps Gen. Joseph Dunford to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force Gen. Paul Selva will be the new vice chairman. It’s the first time in 32 years all members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff are turning over within a year. Nora Bensahel is a distinguished scholar in residence at American University’s School of International Service, and a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council. She tells In Depth with Francis Rose about her recommended reading list for the incoming Joint Chiefs of Staff.

  • David Hawkings: Add Planned Parenthood to the list of things that might shut down the government this fall

    Congress has long promised no government shutdown this year. But some observers think it’s now starting to look more likely. Some Republicans want to tie any appropriations measure — or continuing resolution — to language that would defund Planned Parenthood. Eighteen House Republicans signed a letter before leaving for summer recess. And some senators are joining the movement. David Hawkings, senior editor of Roll Call, writes the Hawkings Here blog. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose that Republicans have fought similar battles before.

  • Joe Brennan: Future federal leases should think about building firewalls

    The global cybersecurity market is currently a $107 billion industry. That value is expected to jump nearly 10 percent each year to $170 billion by 2020. Cybersecurity is a growing priority for agencies across the federal government from defense and the industrial sector, down to food and agriculture. But one big factor all agencies need to consider weaving cybersecurity into as they plan for the future is real estate. Joe Brennan is managing director for the Government Investor Services team at Jones Lang LaSalle. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose how current cybersecurity laws and initiatives will shape federally leased real estate.

  • Report finds few signs of telework abuse at Patent and Trademark Office

    The National Academy of Public Administration concludes that time-and-attendance fraud is neither widespread nor unique to teleworkers at the Patent and Trademark Office.

  • Pentagon, VA say they’re sharing health records despite separate IT systems

    Senior leaders from the departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs have been increasingly vocal in recent weeks about the work they have been doing over the past two years to achieve interoperability in the absence of a common electronic health record, vowing that they can meet Congress’ goal of health data interoperability without actually using the same software.

  • Most TSP funds see growth in July

    The Thrift Savings Plan saw across-the-board growth in July, except for a downturn in the international stocks S fund.

  • Human life detected in the IRS

    When you think of the IRS, words like warm, fuzzy, helpful, friendly, don’t immediately come to mind. But Senior Correspondent Mike Causeys says there are reasons to reconsider that assessment.

  • Joe Brennan: Future federal leases should think about building firewalls

    The global cybersecurity market is currently a $107 billion industry. That value is expected to jump nearly 10 percent each year to $170 billion by 2020. Cybersecurity is a growing priority for agencies across the federal government from defense and the industrial sector, down to food and agriculture. But one big factor all agencies need to consider weaving cybersecurity into as they plan for the future is real estate. Joe Brennan is managing director for the Government Investor Services team at Jones Lang LaSalle. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose how current cybersecurity laws and initiatives will shape federally leased real estate.

More News

Government Events