Don Kettl

  • Continuing resolution or omnibus? Decision looms for Congress as holidays approach

    When Congress returns on Dec. 1, it will be pressed for time on deciding its next course on funding before the current continuing resolution expires at midnight on Dec. 12.

  • Don Kettl, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

    After 50 years of stepping on its neck, now the United States is preparing to normalize relations with Cuba. President Barack Obama’s wide-ranging diplomatic bet involves finance, trade, border security and travel. That means it will spark a lot of work for you, your employees and contractors. Don Kettl, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with more on the implications.

  • Don Kettl, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

    Today is the opening day of the 114th Congress. It’s got a lot to consider, and a lot to accomplish. But what can federal employees expect from this new Washington? Especially with all the new faces joining the floor later this morning. Don Kettl, a professor at the University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with some analysis and predictions.

  • What feds should know about the 114th Congress

    Tuesday marks the first day of the 114th Congress, which mostly serves as a day of ceremony for freshman members. But once the fanfare is over, experts on the Hill say Republicans and Democrats will get right back to settling some old scores left over from 2014.

  • Don Kettl, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

    As it does every two years at the start of a new Congress, the Government Accountability Office will release its “High Risk List” today. The list calls attention to agencies and programs GAO auditors believe are vulnerable to “fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement.” Don Kettl, a professor at the University of Maryland’s School for Public Policy, joined Tom Temin on the Federal Drive with more on the guide, and what’s different from the 2013 version.

  • Don Kettl: IRS is, not surprisingly, unpopular on Capitol Hill

    The Internal Revenue Service has lost about 10 percent of its budget since 2010. The result of that — according to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration — is that the IRS can’t collect as much tax money as it should be collecting. Don Kettl is a professor at University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose that tax collectors have been unpopular for a long time.

  • OPM’s Beth Cobert can learn from former IRS scandal

    Danny Werfel, the former acting IRS commissioner, sheds light on the challenges Beth Cobert, the new acting director of the Office of Personnel Management, will face leading an agency in trouble.

  • Don Kettl: OPM needs to stay focused on its core missions

    The Office of Personnel Management and its new acting director are in crisis mode right now as the agency responds to the largest breach of federal employee data in history. But among the many challenges Beth Cobert faces as she takes the helm at OPM is making sure the agency pays attention to its basic human capital management missions — and doesn’t get distracted by the emergency at hand. Don Kettl is a management expert at the Unversity of Maryland School of Public Policy. He tells In Depth guest host Jared Serbu that the data breach probably wasn’t the fault of former OPM director Katherine Archuleta — but her departure from the agency wasn’t a surprise.

  • Don Kettl: Why government disaster response needs a makeover

    The 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is an opportunity to revisit some lessons learned after that storm. For example, more disasters are happening now than historically. Don Kettl, a professor of public policy at the University of Maryland, and two of his colleagues write about the six major lessons to learn from Katrina. He tells In Depth with Francis Rose that more people expect government help, when a natural disaster strikes.

  • An overlooked but crucial shutdown question: Who’s actually open and who’s closed?

    “Shutdown” is too coarse a word for what happens during a funding lapse. The government acts more as a patchwork. For employees, the challenge is knowing who will also be on the job.