insider threat

  • ICE not sitting on cyber laurels

    Immigration and Customs Enforcement received a score of 95 on its FISMA report card in 2011. Jeff Eisensmith, the ICE CISO, said the agency is implementing continuous monitoring and increasing the training of its employees.

  • Task force drafting strategy to prevent another WikiLeaks

    The Insider Threat Task Force expects to submit its national plan to the White House in the next few months. The Defense Department will use its secure identity cards to stop unauthorized access to data and systems.

  • PM-ISE shepherds secure data sharing tool from validation to expansion

    Through the back-end attribute exchange, agencies can have a standard way for different organizations to safely and securely share sensitive information. The Justice Department conducted a pilot earlier this year and found success with state and local law enforcement agencies accessing the Regional Information Sharing System.

  • Dr. Mike Gelles, Director, Deloitte Consulting LLP

    The government is on high alert for insider threats. From shootings on military base to cybersecurity leaks, it may seem like your officemate could turn into your agency’s worst nightmare. Agencies struggle with appropriate ways to migrate threats. Mike Gelles, a former chief psychologist for the Naval Criminal Investigative Service and now with Deloitte, talked about the threats with Federal Drive hosts Tom Temin and Emily Kopp.

  • Understanding psychology of insider threats could stop the next one

    Everyday behavior of your coworkers could be a sign of a looming insider attack. A new report explains what to watch out for and how agencies can try and predict the next threat.

  • Insider threat programs must find the right ‘trust but verify’ balance

    NSA, State and nearly every other agency are developing “fixes” to protect unauthorized employees from taking data. Experts say employees need to understand why the rules are in place and how they benefit both the organization and worker. OMB says one way to improve the situation is by reducing the number of federal employees with security clearances-an initiative that already is underway.

  • Are agency insider threat programs getting off the ground?

    It’s hard to tell how many agencies are actually checking all the boxes on the Obama administration’s plan for detecting disgruntled or rogue employees. Agencies were supposed to have taken initial steps to set up insider threat programs by June 30, according to an update posted on Performance.gov. But it’s impossible to know the number of agencies who met the initial criteria so far. The progress update says that information is classified.

  • Insider threat program training starts with Security 101

    Quite a number of insider threat incidents have happened because basic security principles were absent, overlooked or ignored. Why Jim Henderson says it’s time we get back to the basics.

  • In and out of government, employers hesitate to Google employees

    From Google searches to LinkedIn connections, a wealth of publicly available online information can reveal a person’s mindset, and possibly tip off the government to the next Edward Snowden or Aaron Alexis. The intelligence community has done some testing, but a final policy remains elusive. Contractors are hesitant.

  • DoD intel chief Vickers gives cyber premier priority status

    Michael Vickers, the undersecretary of Defense for intelligence, said cybersecurity and terrorism are his top two short- and long-term concerns. He said protecting space-based systems is becoming more important than ever. Vickers also wants to continue to transform the military intelligence community to meet ever-changing threats.