• Chattering class ignores real problems

    It may be time to kick some fourth estate butt.

  • Bloomberg Government pushes into D.C. media market

    News website Bloomgberg Government targets lobbyists and Capitol Hill insiders with information on lawmaking and government regulation, The New York Times reports.

  • What’s new at FOSE 2011?

    Wyatt Kash, content director and editor-at-large for 1105 Events, joins host Mark Amtower to discuss 1105’s events in the government market. January 31, 2011

  • Press sweats over covering Trump

    How open or closed will the Trump administration be? How the next president treats the performance dashboards will be instructive.

  • Using tech to ensure a politician’s consistency

    FactSquared founder Bill Frischling works in the center of the interface between technology and politics, and says the former’s use in the field has become an “arms race.”

  • Building trust in a new media DC media entity

    Trust is a key point for Axios, DC’s newest media entity. Building that trust over a digital medium is tricky. “I think the advantage of this day and age is that you get an opportunity to. It’s easier than ever to launch a media company, because technology has enabled it,” said co-founder Roy Schwartz.

    “They’ll give you a chance. And then you have to prove that you’re truly worthy of their time and attention.”

  • Media loves repeating the president’s bad word

    Presidents have always used colorful language normally behind closed doors. But should the media repeat it for all the world to see?

  • How Axios builds trust in an uneasy media landscape

    What’s Working in Washington talks to Kim Hart, managing editor at news outlet Axios. While trust in media is at an all-time low in America, Hart explains how Axios is working to make objective truth a top priority in reporting.

  • Transparency groups decry Air Force media crackdown as new details emerge

    The Air Force is cutting base visits and media interviews for fear of “giving insights to our adversaries, which could erode our military advantage” in what it calls a public relations reset.

  • Air Force carpet bombs public affairs

    Following a new set of policies concerning public affairs officers, the Air Force is cutting back on interviews and base visits for journalists.