Navy Yard shooting

  • Senators seek probe into how Navy shooter got clearance

    Key senators on the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee are seeking answers into how the contractor employee responsible for the mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard that killed 12 people obtained his security clearance. In a Sept. 18 letter, Sens. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Jon Tester (D-Mont.), requested the Office of Personnel Management’s inspector general look into what type of clearance the shooter, identified as 34-year-old Aaron Alexis, held as well as what federal agency conducted his background investigation.

  • OPM defends 2007 background check of Navy Yard shooter

    The same company that performed National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden’s background investigation also performed a check of Aaron Alexis, the IT contractor who shot and killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard Monday. The Office of Personnel Management said it believes Alexis’ background check was complete and that the Defense Department signed off on the results of the background check.

  • NAVSEA looks to temporarily relocate workers in wake of Navy Yard shooting

    Naval Sea Systems Command leadership will work to find alternative work accommodations for the 3,000 employees who worked in the command’s headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard facility. The building was the site of a mass shooting Monday in which 13, people, including the gunman, were killed.

  • Quality not a priority in security clearance process, GAO says

    Concerns over missed red flags in Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis’s background have thrust the federal government’s security clearance program into the spotlight. But the problem is likely bigger than one company. The Office of Personnel Management — and its contractors — which accounts for 90 percent of the federal government’s background investigations, has faced persistent challenges with security clearances over the years, according to the Government Accountability Office.

  • Federal building security at risk due to lax training, oversight

    A new report from the Government Accountability Office fueled a House subcommittee hearing that revealed security concerns regarding the training and certification of contract guards employed by the Federal Protective Service.

  • Pentagon reviews find Navy Yard shootings were preventable

    Newly-released results of three parallel investigations into last September’s Washington Navy Yard shootings point to serious gaps in the government’s own security process. But the Navy’s review finds the killings could have been prevented if the shooter’s employer had disclosed troubling details about his recent behavior.

  • White House backs 13 recommendations to improve security clearance process

    Six months after 34-year-old IT contractor Aaron Alexis opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard killing 12 people, concerns about missed red flags in his background and gaps in the security clearance process are now turning into action. The Obama administration released the findings of a interagency review of the federal security clearance process Tuesday. Among the 13 recommendations for shoring up the system are continuously evaluating clearance holders rather than relying on infrequent check-ups and improving investigators’ access to state and local police records.

  • Jon Adler, national president, Federal Law Enforcement Officers Association

    The White House has a government-wide security plan to prevent another Navy Yard Shooting.

  • Just a test: Anacostia-Bolling trains for active-shooter attack

    The hallways of a building at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling echoed with the sounds of gunfire last month as part of a training exercise to help base law enforcement personnel prepare for an active-shooter event.

  • Greg Rinckey, Managing Partner, Tully Rinckey

    Today is the one-year anniversary of the Navy Yard Shooting. Federal agencies are trying to reform the security clearance process to keep dangerous people out of your office. The Office of Personnel Management is has cancelled its contract with USIS, one of the companies responsible for doing background checks. Greg Rinckey is a managing partner at the law firm Tully Rinckey. On In Depth with Francis Rose, he said so far the security clearance reforms are just hollow achievements.