Navy Yard

  • Federal job description: Sometimes deadly

    Working for the federal government, no matter who you are or where you work, can be dangerous, Senior Correspondent Mike Causey says. Sometimes deadly. There was the Oklahoma City bombing, and the aerial attacks on the Pentagon and the IRS in Austin. And again yesterday in a high-security Navy operation in D.C.

  • IG cites major flaws with Navy’s vetting of contractors

    In an effort to reduce costs, officials at the Navy put in place a system for granting contractors access to installations that ended up allowing as many as 52 convicted felons access to bases, according to a Defense Department inspector general report released Tuesday. The IG found the system, called Rapidgate, failed to comply with federal standards and that background checks were conducted using only publicly accessible databases. The security of Navy installations was thrown into the spotlight Monday after 34-year-old contractor Aaron Alexis entered the Washington Navy Yard Monday morning where he shot and killed 12 people.

  • Obama, DoD order reviews of security procedures

    In the wake of the shooting in which 12 civilian and contract employees were gunned down at the Washington Navy Yard Monday, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered a review of security procedures at all Defense Department bases worldwide.

  • Navy sets up multiple avenues for survivors, employees to get help

    Ed Cannon, the Navy’s director of fleet and family readiness program, said the service deployed its special psychiatric rapid intervention team to provide assistance to employees who survived the tragedy at the Navy Yard.

  • Four years after Ft. Hood, Pentagon still studying base security

    DoD still is working to implement dozens of recommendations that followed the 2009 Fort Hood shooting. The Pentagon wants to create a system that notifies security managers about potential problems with clearance holders ahead of time.

  • Who were the victims in the Washington Navy Yard shooting?

    Thirteen people were killed when 34-year-old Aaron Alexis opened fire at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday, Sept. 16. The shooter himself was killed in a gun battle with the police. These are the stories of the victims.

  • NAVSEA looks to temporarily relocate workers in wake of Navy Yard shooting

    Naval Sea Systems Command leadership will work to find alternative work accommodations for the 3,000 employees who worked in the command’s headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard facility. The building was the site of a mass shooting Monday in which 13, people, including the gunman, were killed.

  • Navy Yard task force focusing on return to normal

    A month after IT contractor Aaron Alexis gunned down a dozen colleagues at the Washington Navy Yard, the Navy has assembled a team of experts to handle every aspect of the recovery effort, from restoring operations at the facility to continuing to care for those affected by the tragedy. Dennis McGinn, the assistant secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installation and Environment (EI&E) has been tasked with leading the recovery task force.

  • Whistleblowers warned of security gaps prior to Navy Yard shooting

    A newly-disclosed report makes clear that security managers at the Washington Navy Yard had tried to point out at least some security deficiencies well in advance of the September 2013 shootings.

  • ODNI issues social media guidance for background checks

    The Office of the Director of National Intelligence released much-anticipated guidance on using social media during background checks.Bill Evanina, director of the National Counterintelligence and Security Center at ODNI, said the policy is a collaborative effort to “strike the right balance” between obtaining publicly available information but not stepping on civil liberties.