Rainmakers and Money Savers

  • Dirty money: How asset forfeiture is returning billions to the federal coffers

    In 2013, the U.S. Marshals Service sold more than 22,000 seized assets for a total of $2 billion. In part one of our special report, Rainmakers and Money Savers, Federal News Radio goes behind the scenes of the Justice Department’s asset forfeiture programs to examine the work federal employees are doing on a daily basis, resulting in billions of dollars going straight into the federal coffers.

  • SSA OIG employees turn limited budget into 20-to-1 return on investment

    The Social Security Administration Office of Inspector General almost tripled its goal to return $8 for every $1 spent on the agency. Between October 2013 and March 2014, the IG recovered millions in criminal convictions, audits and legal penalties, contributing to an overall 20-to-1 return on investment for American taxpayers. In part two of our special report, Rainmakers and Money Savers, Federal News Radio goes behind the scenes of the SSA OIG to examine the work federal employees are doing on a daily basis, resulting in billions of dollars going straight into the federal coffers.

  • Ciera Crawford, Producer, Federal News Radio

    Who in the federal government saves Uncle Sam money? Who makes money for him? Federal News Radio’s special report, Rainmakers and Money Savers, answers these questions. You know about the IRS and and Medicaid Fraud Control Units. But many other programs also keep an eye on federal coffers. In part one of our report, Ciera Crawford profiles three modern day federal Robin Hoods who redistribute the wealth. Read Ciera’s related article .

  • Saving money by making money: One engineer’s quest saves millions at the US Mint

    A savings of $2 million per year is now being realized at the U.S. Mint after an innovative engineer stepped out of the box and asked a friend at another federal agency for help. In part three of our special report, Rainmakers and Money Savers, Federal News Radio takes you inside the lab where a group of engineers and nanotribologists combined their expertise to solve a coin-making problem and, in turn, saved a lot of cash.

  • SEC employees harness big data, cloud to open up savings and new possibilities

    The Securities and Exchange Commission is responsible for billions of financial trade records a day, but it took the agency weeks and months and analyze them. The SEC quietly found a way to speed up that process — and save about $3 million at the same time. In part four of our special report, ,Rainmakers and Money Savers, Federal News Radio goes behind the scenes of the Securities and Exchange Commission to examine the work federal employees are doing on a daily basis, resulting in millions of dollars going straight into the federal coffers.